Reports of Claims Preferred to the House of Lords; In the Cases of the Cassillis, Sutherland, Spynie, and Glencairn Peerages...

Reports of Claims Preferred to the House of Lords; In the Cases of the Cassillis, Sutherland, Spynie, and Glencairn Peerages...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...him. ' Counsel were heard upon these various claims at great length, and thereafter the following opinions were delivered: --21st March, 1771. Lonn MANSFIELD. MY LORDS--This is a question concerning a very ancient peerage. Three several persons have preferred petitions to his Majesty, (which have been referred to this House, ) claiming the titles, honours, and dignities of the Earldom of Sutherland. It appears by the evidence which has been produced, that this peerage was enjoyed as far back as 1275, by William, then designed Earl of Sutherland, in an original instrument produced. Mr Sutherland of Forse claims this peerage as heirmale of William Earl of Sutherland, and has proved his pedigree. It is claimed by Lady Elizabeth, the daughter and only child of William, late Earl of Sutherland, who died in 1766, as heir of the body of this William Earl of Sutherland, who existed in 1275; that is, as legally entitled to this dignity, it having been originally granted, and descending to heirsgeneral, and there appearing no subsequent resignation or new creation in favour of heirs-male. Sir Robert Gordon claims upon a resignation of the dignity, and a new grant thereof, sometime between June 1515 and September 1516, in favour of his ancestor Adam Gordon, who married Elizabeth, the heiress of the Earldom. When these petitions came to be supported at your Lordships' bar, all the several parties concurred and agreed in these facts--that an heir-male existed in 1515, who did not then claim the dignity; and that there appeared no special grant, no original creation or limitation of this honour, in favour of any particular line of heirs. All the parties treated this peerage as descending in the male line, until the death of John Earl of Sutherland...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236849345
  • 9781236849342