Reports of Cases at Law and in Chancery Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Illinois Volume 216

Reports of Cases at Law and in Chancery Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Illinois Volume 216

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...and any attempt to compel an individual, firm or corporation to execute an agreement to conduct his or its business through certain agencies or by a particular class of employees is not only unlawful and actionable, but is an interference with the highest civil right. 13. SAME--attempt to compel signing of "closed shop" agreement is unlawful. An attempt to compel an employer to sign an agreement to conduct his business by employing only members of labor unions, under threats of ordering a strike, is unlawful. such an agreement being violative of the legal rights of the employer and unjust and oppressive as to non-union employees. WR1T oF ERROR to the Appellate Court for the First District;--heard in that court on appeal from the Superior Court of Cook county; the Hon. JESSE HOLDOM, Judge, presiding. These several cases come to this court on writ of error to the Appellate Court for the First District. On May 25, I903, the Kellogg Switchboard and Supply Company, a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Illinois and engaged in the business of manufacturing and selling telephones, switchboards and electrical supplies, with its principal office in Chicago, filed its bill for an injunction in the superior court of Cook county against certain parties named therein as defendants. The bill alleged that complainant employed from five hundred to eight hundred men and girls in its factory and had invested about $500,000 in machinery, patents, equipments, etc.; that it had in its employ a large number of mechanics who were members of various labor unions with local lodges in Chicago, and it also had a large number of skilled mechanics who were not associated or affiliated with any union; that a large majority of its employees...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 230 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 417g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123698594X
  • 9781236985941