Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Admiralty, Commencing with the Judgments Of; The Right Hon. Sir William Scott, Trinity Term 1811 - By John Dodson

Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Admiralty, Commencing with the Judgments Of; The Right Hon. Sir William Scott, Trinity Term 1811 - By John Dodson

List price: US$22.40

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1815 edition. Excerpt: ...all the causes of the war. It does not stand in the same substantive way as the former part of the article, and must be considered as mere explanatory description. The nature of a treaty of peace is well explained by Vattel, who lays it down that " a treaty of peace can be no more '5 than ansi agreement. Were the rules (he says) of " an exact and precise justice to be observed in-it, 5' each punctually receiving all that belongs to him, ' a peace would become impossible." He goes on to say, that " as in the most just cause we are never to " lose fight of the restoration of peace, but are con" stantly to tend towards this salutary view, no other " way is left than to agree on all the claims and griev" ances on both sides, and to extinguish all differences " by the most equitable convention which the juncture ' will admit of." It is-therefore an agreement to wave all discuffion concerning the respective rights of the parties, and to bury in oblivion all the original causes of the war. It is an explanation of the nature of that peace and good understanding which is to take place between the two countries, whenever that event shall be happily accomplished. It would be a stretch beyond the limits to which a fair interpretation of these words could be carried, to say they were intended to convey any rated from each other by a very narrow space, it does not follow that one of them maynot exercise the rights question was, whether the represent-ation-made by the master, that the owner resided in-this country, would take the ship out of the protection to which_ she. would, otherwise be entitled under the terms of the licence. JUDGMENT. JUDGMENT. Sir W. Scotch-This ship was proceeding from Hull to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236789326
  • 9781236789327