Reports of Cases Argued and Adjudged in the Supreme Court of the United States. February Term, 1816[-January Term, 1827] Volume 2

Reports of Cases Argued and Adjudged in the Supreme Court of the United States. February Term, 1816[-January Term, 1827] Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...not by a distinct and independent sovereignty, created by themselves. To the formation of a league, such as was the confederation, the State sovereignties were certainly competent. But when, "in order to form a more perfect union," it was deemed necessary to change this alliance into an effective government, possessing great and sovereign powers, and acting directly on the people, the necessity of referring it to the people, and of deriving its powers directly from them, was felt and acknowledged by all. The government of the Union, then, (whatever may be the influence of this fact on the case, ) is, emphatically, and truly, a government of the people. is19. In form and in substance it emanates from them. svv/ T 1,1, M'CulIocb its powers are granted by them, and are to be ex-v. ercised directly on them, and for their benefit. Stu &' This government is acknowledged by all to be one of enumerated powers. The principle, that it can exercise only the powers granted to it, would seem too apparent to have required to be enforced by all those arguments which its enlightened friends, while it was depending before the people, found it necessary to urge. That principle is now universally admitted. But the question respecting the extent of the powers actually granted, is perpetually arising, and will probably continue to arise, as long as our system shall exist. In discussing these questions, the conflicting powers of the general and State governments must be brought into view, and the supremacy of their respective laws, when they are in opposition, must be settled. If any one proposition could command the universal assent of mankind, we might expect it would be this--that the government of the Union, though limited in its powers, is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 218 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494555
  • 9781236494559