Report on the Scientific Results of the Voyage of H.M.S. Challenger During the Years 1873-76 Under the Command of Captain George S. Nares and the Late Captain Frank Tourle Thomson Volume 5, V. 32

Report on the Scientific Results of the Voyage of H.M.S. Challenger During the Years 1873-76 Under the Command of Captain George S. Nares and the Late Captain Frank Tourle Thomson Volume 5, V. 32

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...pinnules, which are curved slightly upwards, but have an insertion almost at right angles to the branch. There may be from three to five in one revolution of the axis, and about six or eight to a centimetre. These pinnules vary very much in length, many are slender, only slightly tapering, and from 1 to 15 cm. long; others which are longer bear secondary pinnules. These may be 5 cm. long, arched upwards, so that the apex takes a subvertical direction, and then bear secondary pinnules spirally arranged, and varying from 05 to 15 cm. or more in length; most are simple, but a few become again divided. The whole corallum is fused into a firm mass, not so much by a confluence of parts as by frequent adhesions between the pinnules of adjoining branches and branchlets. At almost every point of contact a fusion takes place. The spines are elongate, and somewhat related in form to those of some species of Aphanipathes (e.g., Aphanipathes barbadensis). A spiral arrangement is not well marked, but the spines are arranged in longitudinal rows, of which five may be seen from one aspect. The spines are about equal in length to the diameter of the axis in their neighbourhood, and are laterally compressed, ending in a blunt point formed by the lower margin taking a sharp curve upwards to join the upper margin. The members of a row are usually separated by an interval greater than the length of a spine (PI. XI. fig. 22). There are a number of specimens in the Zoological Museum at Copenhagen which appear to belong to this species, but differ from M.-Edwards' type, in having a more slender corallum, the branchlets of which are irregularly placed, not in a distinct spiral. The largest specimen is 41 cm. long, 30 cm. broad, and 13 cm. thick. The stem near the base...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544994
  • 9781236544995