Report on the Events and Circumstances, Which Produced the Union of England and Scotland; On the Effects of This Event [By J. Bruce]. [With] Appendix

Report on the Events and Circumstances, Which Produced the Union of England and Scotland; On the Effects of This Event [By J. Bruce]. [With] Appendix

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1799 edition. Excerpt: ...and Portugal were united, the Spaniards only were allowed to trade to the West-Indies, and the Portuguese to the East-Indies: the Dutch East and West-India Companies only, not the other: suhi jects of the United States, trade to these distant countries; so that it would be discouraging the spirit of trade in England, if after establishing distant commerce at a vast expence, others of the King's subjects might come and reap the benesit: --Nor are the Scots debarred from exercising the business of merchants, or sactors, in any of these, settlements, any more than the subjects: of, England are: --.., ., lt..: .., ..--That compliance with the demand for (hips of Scotland to bring foreign raer, chandUft. -isi.. into into England, would be a severe blow to the trade and navigation of the Kingdom; and cannot be consented to, because the kingdom of Scotland being independent of that of England, its subjects could not be made answerable to the laws of England, which enforce the regulations in the Act of Navigation: ----The Act of Navigation, besides, is not new in England, but, under various forms, has appeared in different periods of its history: -----That the cafe of Ireland, by no means applied, because Ireland belongs to the Crown of England, and the same laws bind the Irish and English subjects; and besides, laws made by the Parliament of Ireland, sirst pass the Privy Council of England: --That the orders of the Council, and the great seal of England, have effect in Ireland, and the Treasurer and the other great ossicers in England, have jurisdiction in it, circumstances which enable England to give them common privileges, because they can be, by law, obliged to observe the restrictions, under which these privileges may be exercised. That thshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236607406
  • 9781236607409