Report on Deep-Sea Deposits Based on the Specimens Collected During the Voyage of H. M. S. Challenger in the Years 1872 to 1876

Report on Deep-Sea Deposits Based on the Specimens Collected During the Voyage of H. M. S. Challenger in the Years 1872 to 1876

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...figured here belong especially to the acid variety. 1 A Penck, "Studien iiber lockere vulkanische Auswurflinge," Zeitschr. d. d. geol. Gemlhch., 1878, pp. 97-129; J. S. Diller, "Volcanic Sand which fell at Unahalaslika, Alaska, Oct. 20, 1883," Science, vol. iii. p. 651. Basic Volcanic Glass.--In many regions of the deep sea the Challenger Expedition collected numerous lapilli and pebble-like fragments of compact volcanic glass, which, although more or less limited and localised in their distribution, appear to be the most important volcanic products in deep-sea deposits after the pumice fragments above described. While these glasses are known only from a few geological formations, and from a few eruptions of recent volcanoes at the surface of the continents, they, on the other hand, appear in abundance and in most typical form among the products of submarine eruptions, as if the deep oceans had been in some way specially favourable to the development of this lithological type. We devote, in consequence, a considerable space to the description and illustration of these glassy particles and the products of their alteration. All the chief varieties found at the different stations are included in these descriptions, and in their structure they pass, on the one hand, into basic pumice, and on the other into basaltic fragments with a vitreous base. The most characteristic of these lapilli of basic volcanic glass collected by the various trawlings and dredgings vary from the size of a walnut to that of a pea, and minuter fragments descend to the mean dimensions of the mineral particles found in the clays and oozes, when their nature becomes masked from their small size; it is only by following the transitions from the larger...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 210 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236583213
  • 9781236583215