Report of the U.S. Naval "Liquid Fuel" Board of Tests Conducted on the Hohenstein Water Tube Boiler; Showing the Relative Evaporative Efficiencies of Coal and Liquid Fuel Under Forced and Natural Draft Conditions as Determined by an

Report of the U.S. Naval "Liquid Fuel" Board of Tests Conducted on the Hohenstein Water Tube Boiler; Showing the Relative Evaporative Efficiencies of Coal and Liquid Fuel Under Forced and Natural Draft Conditions as Determined by an

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...as well as the general character of the oil-burning installation, and after special investigation regarded the equipment as one not constituting an element of danger sufficient to demand higher insurance rates. In order to detect and collect any leakage of oil a cofferdam had been constructed both forward and aft of the principal fuel-oil bunker. At the end of the journey no leakage of oil had been observed. The oil used was from the California wells, a product which had undergone a light distillation, thus making it less explosive and less harmful to boiler and bunker plates. In past years it had been observed that very injurious effects were produced upon the ends of boiler tubes and on the seams of plates with the use of crude petroleum as fuel. The experience of the superintending engineer of this line, Mr. Lassoe, is that when oil is slightly refined its use is less harmful than in the case of coal to all parts of the boiler, providing the liquid fuel is burned in a proper manner. When firing boilers with coal as a fuel the firemen have necessarily to keep the furnace doors open a considerable time in order to secure efficient results. When the doors are opened for working a coal fire the cold air rushes in, and it is a fair estimate that the heat of the furnace during this time drops as much as several hundred degrees. With such extreme and rapid changes of temperature there must be a tendency of plates and even of tubes to contract, and attendant injury to the boiler often ensues. With the use of oil as a fuel it was found that the furnace doors did not need to be opened during the entire journey, and a more constant heat was thus obtained throughout the boiler. The full efficiency of the boiler is therefore more likely to be secured with...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236578511
  • 9781236578518