Report, Submitted to the Commissioner of Public Health and Public Health Council, January 3, 1920

Report, Submitted to the Commissioner of Public Health and Public Health Council, January 3, 1920

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...--namely, a sink and not more than three wash trays--may all be connected into a single 4-inch round trap, provided that the length of waste pipe from the most distant outlet of the group to the trap does not exceed 3 feet, 6 inches. (This figure is arbitrarily chosen, and is based on experience, not on scientific experiment. In some cities 3 feet is stated. Some cities require a 5-inch trap.) The bathtub and basin of the ordinary bathroom group may be connected into a single 4-inch round trap, provided that the distance of either outlet from the trap does not exceed 3 feet, 8 inches. Four sinks or bowls in a continuous line or in a cluster, if in contact with each other, may all be connected into a single 4-inch round trap, provided that the length of the waste pipe from the most distant outlet to the trap does not exceed 3 feet, 6 inches. In all of these exceptional cases the trap should be placed as nearly as possible in the center of the group, and in all cases it is understood that the separate fixtures are in the same room. No waste pipe from sinks, ' tubs or wash trays should be connected into the lead bend of a watercloset or slop sink. CoNNEc'rIoN BETwEEN WATER-CLOSET FIXTURE AND Son. PIPE. This "floor connection" is one of the most vulnerable points of the entire plumbing system. Inspections of old houses show a large percentage of leaks at this joint. The tightness of the joint depends largely upon the integrity of a layer of putty placed between two flanges bolted together. If good putty is used and the joint well set up, it will remain tight for a very long time; but inferior putty may crumble, and joints are not infrequently made (temporary connections carelessly or deliberately overlooked) with no putty at...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236946502
  • 9781236946508