Report of the Speeches Delivered at the Conference of Ministers and 1members of Dissenting Churches, Held at Edinburgh, on the 11th, 12th and 13th January 1842; To Express Their Opinion of the Injustice and Immoral Tendency of the Corn

Report of the Speeches Delivered at the Conference of Ministers and 1members of Dissenting Churches, Held at Edinburgh, on the 11th, 12th and 13th January 1842; To Express Their Opinion of the Injustice and Immoral Tendency of the Corn

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...bayonets? N o, I am convinced they must have been well aware that these laws were viewed by the people as a great infringement u n the principles of just legislation. Ever since that period, I have looke upon these laws as the master-iece of injustice and partiality. I would ask, How does it happen that t is country is so often visited with commercial distress? In 1816 we had a panic from, it was called, the return of peace; but I might add, from a bad cro, and the operation of the Corn Laws passed the year before. In 1819 we ad again another panic; in 1826 the Bank panic; in 1830 again a panic, and those engaged in the woollen trade will know, that wool was lower that year than at any period since the first American war. Then the panic of 1837, with all its ruinous effects, are too well known to be named. With a country possessing more capital, more commercial enterprize, more skilful artizans, and industry surpassed by none, we must look for a cause for all these various periods of misery and distress (hear, hear). I find the cause in the Corn Laws, whose sliding operations are ever sliding our demand for foreign grain, and the foreigners demand for our manufactures, on a dangerous and ruinous scale (applausef). Some say the frequent recurrence of our commercial panics proceeds rom over-banking, over-production, and over-population. Over-banking may be a very bad thing; but what is it? Why, banking only furnishes us with a circulatin medium for exchange of commodities; for, after all, the great principle o trade is Barter; and do our Corn Laws not afi"ect our barter?-Why, we have a bad harvest, and a great demand for foreign wheat s rings up, our merchants send out vessels to the Black Sea and the Ba tie, and the moment we appea.r...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236827465
  • 9781236827463