Report of the Royal Commissioners for Inquiring Into the Laws of Naturalization and Allegiance; Together with an Appendix Containing an Account of British and Foreign Laws, and of the Diplomatic Correspondence Which Has Passed on the

Report of the Royal Commissioners for Inquiring Into the Laws of Naturalization and Allegiance; Together with an Appendix Containing an Account of British and Foreign Laws, and of the Diplomatic Correspondence Which Has Passed on the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...jurisdiction, and thus enabled to evade legal obligations existing in the state of Virginia; but those obligations do not the less continue in force within that State, until discharged by its laws. This doctrine comprehends citizens of that State a fortiori its subjects. But the more material question is of the obligations of citizens to the State itself. And here, the proposition is a general one; thus, a citizen of the State of Virginia cannot, by emigration, discharge himself of any obligation to the State, the non-performance of which involves by its laws any penal consequence. If he leave the State under such circumstances, though under pretence of expatriation, he is a fugitive from justice, not a lawful emigrant; the State will demand his extradition from the State to which he assumes to emigrate, and obtain it, in virtue of an express provision of the Constitution of the United States; and the State will itself deliver up, on demand, any such person undertaking to emigrate to it from any other State. (Code, tit. x, ch. 17, 8-16. The State of Kentucky imitated the State of Virginia in this respect, repeating in substance, and almost in the same words, the enactment of the latter as well as to citizenship as expatriation. No other State of the Union has, so far as my observation extends, attempted to solve these interesting questions by express legislation. The Constitution of the State of Pennsylvania declares that "emigration from the State shall not be prohibited." (Art. lx. 25). The same provision is contained in the Constitution of the State of Indiana, and, it may be, of some other States. But this declaration is to be taken subject to all the qualifications which have been exhibited in discussing the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236503856
  • 9781236503855