Report of the Royal Commissioners Appointed to Inquire Into the Operation of the Land Transfer ACT, and Into the Present Condition of the Registry of Deeds for the County of Middlesex, Together with Minutes of Evidence and Appendix

Report of the Royal Commissioners Appointed to Inquire Into the Operation of the Land Transfer ACT, and Into the Present Condition of the Registry of Deeds for the County of Middlesex, Together with Minutes of Evidence and Appendix

List price: US$30.44

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...by the owner of a large long-descended family estate, much intermixed with other estates, to put it on the register, might stir up litigation between him and the owners of half of the other lands in the county. 28. It is almost needless to point out that these provisions would open a wide door to fraud, and that whenever the owner of the adjoining land was anxious to preserve his rights, he would be compelled to incur expense in investigating the applicant's claim, and in many cases in opposing it. 29. It is not consistent with justice that a landowner should be thus forced into a litigious contest with another without provision being made for the palyment of at least all the expenses unwillingly incurred by im in defending his rights; but the bill (clause 65) does not appear to contain any adequate provision for the purpose. 30. The question of expense is very material to the working of the scheme proposed by the bill. At present the purchaser actually pays the larger share of the expenses on a sale, and the vendor guards himself by special provisions against part of the expense to which he would otherwise be subjected. Virtually, however, the vendor bears almost all the expense, because the purchaser, in deciding on the price which he will pay, makes an allowance for his expected costs; but the vendor is not so conscious of the clqsts which he thus bears as he would be if he actually paid t em. 31. Leaving all other objections out of consideration, the probability is that, except in a few cases, as where a large estate was to be sold in lots, the vendor would prefer to sell his estate under special conditions, as he now can, rather than involve himself in the expensive and possibly dilatory course of procedure which might be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 186 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 340g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236815866
  • 9781236815866