Report Relating to the Registry and Return of Births, Marriages and Deaths and of Divorce in the State of Rhode Island. 1862-66

Report Relating to the Registry and Return of Births, Marriages and Deaths and of Divorce in the State of Rhode Island. 1862-66

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ... series. This is shown in the aggregate for the whole State, as well as in the returns from some of the larger divisions, and is confirmed by the facts for a longer period. Bristol, Kent and Washington counties seem to have been exempt from any special epidemic of scarlatina, during the seven years included in the table. The returns for 1865 will probably show a large percentage from this disease in Bristol county. Diphtheria first appeared in the list of causes of death in Rhode Island, in 1858, and, in the aggregate for the whole State, has increased each year since that time, with one exception. It has hardly become epidemic in that time, in any part of the State, except in Washington and Kent counties; but has increased in all portions of the State. It would seem from our experience thus far, as well as from the facts generally in New England, that diphtheria is more a disease of the country than of cities. The mortality from it has been less, actually, and relatively, in Providence and Newport, than in the rest of the State. Scarlatina, on the contrary, has been much more prevalent and fatal, during the period under consideration, in the city than in the countrj'. Croup shows no special difference between the city and country, depending, probably, more upon season than upon locality. Nor does the mortality from croup vary much from year to year. It is true that the number of deaths reported from croup has increased from year to year, since 1858, coincident with the rise of diphtheria. The latter disease often terminates fatally by the extension of the diphtheritic membrane into the trachea, giving rise to symptoms similar to those of croup, and it is my opinion that the increased mortality reported from croup, during the last seven years, is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236527364
  • 9781236527363