Report of a Public Discussion Carried on by Henry Townley and George Jacob Holyoake on the Question - Is There Sufficient Proof of the Existence of a God?; Ed. with Notes by H. Townley

Report of a Public Discussion Carried on by Henry Townley and George Jacob Holyoake on the Question - Is There Sufficient Proof of the Existence of a God?; Ed. with Notes by H. Townley

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...I surely do no more than the gentleman on the other side proposes; and the fault may be mine in not seeing the weight of the reasons presented to us, but the fault cannot be because I require those reasons. There can be no fault in requiring the reasons, since the profession of the Christian is, that his form of faith is more rational than the form of faith of any other persons; for, if he does not make that profession, he ought to adopt the faith of other persons, and give up his own; and if he does not give up his own, it is because he deems his more rational than others. I am not wrong, therefore, in requiring that some attempt should be made to satisfy my understanding on the subject. I see, in the province of God with respect to nature, the sort of abstract Deity of whom mention has been made in this discussion before. I see, in the province of such a Being with respect to nature, the near relation of such a Being to nature; and--if without presumption I may say it--more, the philosophic necessity of there being such a distinct and abstract entity over nature. The existence of nature--lam now explaining, incidentally, a small part of my conception--the existence of nature all may know; it is the first act of consciousness; man tries his power upon it--he finds it boundless. "When he reaches what he feels to be the confines of space, he instantly imagines something beyond in every direction. The telescope reveals what appears as limitless phenomena. Acknowledging its extent, he next comes to inquire into its age or duration--whence did this nature originate? It could not have been created--whence did it come? From nothing? That seems impossible; at least, we are unable to conceive how this miracle could have been performed. Now, did...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236545575
  • 9781236545572