Report of the Proceedings of the Meeting of the Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf Volume 11

Report of the Proceedings of the Meeting of the Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf Volume 11

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...refer to Mr. Crouter's paper. I desire to ask Mr. Crouter if he, in receiving pupils into his institution, first introduced them into the oral department? MR. CROUTER: No, sir. MR. NoYEs: How do you know who are suitable subjects for the oral classes?...., MR. CROUTER: They are all received into the institution. There is but one institution, and they become pupils of it. Those who are semi-mute or semi-deaf are sent to the oral department. Then there are some bright deaf pupils come to us that I think possibly may be taught in that way, and they are also sent to the ora department at once. At least, we did that last year. MR. NoYEs: Are you always able, during the first week after their admission, to determine who are proper subjects for the oral classes? MR. CRoU'rER: Not in cases of congenital mutes. Ma. NoYEs: Did-you ever discover, after years of trial in a sign classl, (?that the pupil, almost of a sudden, developed an ability to spea. MR. CRoUTER: I presume there are such cases. MR. NoYEs: Can you suggest to this convention some method by which the Superintendent or Principal can be quite sure of determining those who are proper subjects for the oral classes? Suppose we have thirty pupils admitted at the opening of the term. Within the first ten days of that term, how can we be sure that we have obtained for the oral classes all those that ought to be in there? MR. CRoU'rER: In the case of those who are con enitally deaf, there is but one way in which the matter could be final y decided, and that would be by giving them all oral instruction. MR. NoYEs: Your theory is that all should be put under an oral teacher, and be kept there? MR. CRoUTER: No, sir; I made no such statement. MR. NoYEs: That this hourly drill in articulation...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 180 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 331g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236934458
  • 9781236934451