Report of the Proceedings in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau; Tried in the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term, and Beginning November 14, 1881 Volume 1

Report of the Proceedings in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau; Tried in the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term, and Beginning November 14, 1881 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...nothing more thought of him for a week; at any rate, I had my hands full and couldn't bother with him. Q. What was the next you saw of him 1-A. The next I saw of him Mr. Olds came to the kitchen-door and says " I want to see you." I went out to see him, and he says, "Char es is out here." I says, " Why don't he come in 1 " and I went down by the gate and talked with him. Q. Did you find him i--A. I found him under a tree outside the gate. I talked with him a litt-le while, and among other things I told him he had better come in and stay until you got home, and see what would be done. He said he didn't want to come in as long as Louis was there. I said, " You need not bother about Louis." Mr. Olds had moved to the cottage at the time, just a stone's throw from the house, near the barn. I says. " If you don't want to come to the house, go to the cottage and stay with Olds. I will provide you with a bed and with meals there, so you will have no more trouble with anybody." We finally persuaded him to come in, and I sent over his dinner, and sent him his supper that night, and in the mean time I had an opportunity to talk with my son, and told him what I thought of the boy, and that he must-not interfere with him until his father came home. Q. N o matter what you told your son; it is not legal evidence. You say he staid at the cottage a short time 7-A. He might have slept there a few nights. He did sleep therea ew nights, because I wanted Olds to watch hini. t Q. Did he come back to your house again?--A. I hardly think he did. I don't know whether he slept in the house or not. Q. Something was said by one of the witnesses about his borrowing some...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 524 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 27mm | 925g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236765524
  • 9781236765529