Report of the Proceedings and Arguments in the Probate Court of the City and County of San Francisco, State of California, on the Trial to Admit to Probate the "Last Will and Testament" of Horace Hawes, (Deceased)

Report of the Proceedings and Arguments in the Probate Court of the City and County of San Francisco, State of California, on the Trial to Admit to Probate the "Last Will and Testament" of Horace Hawes, (Deceased)

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...the two overlap one another, do they not? A. Sometimes they seem to stand upon the border between sanity and insanity. It is almost impossible, frequently, to tell which side to place the person upon. Q. Suppose the deluded opinion in a given case--what we assumed to be a deluded opinion--depends upon evidence--that is the fact; that is embedded in a deluded opinion, depends upon the evidence; if there was no evidence whatever, on which to base the delusion, would you pronounce the patient, necessarily, a monomaniac? A. If there was evidence to establish as true the particular idea that others might call a delusion, I would not consider it as settled that it was a delusion in the individual at all, but that he had formed his opinion from evidence. Q. Suppose the evidence in regard to the existence of that fact is conflicting, and assume that a large preponderance of the evidence is against the existence of the fact; but notwithstanding the preponderance being against it, there is still some evidence tending to support it; the patient rejects the preponderance of testimony and believes the lesser weight of testimony, and insists upon it against the preponder ance of evidence that the fact exists, would that necessarily involve any disturbance at all of any of the intellectual faculties? A. It might and might not. It would depend a great deal upon the intelligence of the witness, and the degree of preponderance, or the weight of evidence against it. Q. Some men are a great deal more credulous of a fact than others, are they not? A. They are. Q. And some men would be ready to believe against the preponderance of evidence that a fact did still exist and still not be at all insane? ' A. Well, I could not answer very corTectly to that, unless I...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 324 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 581g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236840127
  • 9781236840127