Report of the North Carolina Geological Survey; Agriculture of the Eastern Counties Together with Descriptions of the Fossils of the Marl Beds

Report of the North Carolina Geological Survey; Agriculture of the Eastern Counties Together with Descriptions of the Fossils of the Marl Beds

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...yet a very large proportion would be. Some of the marls, as analysis proves, contain seventy-five per cent of sand. The concentration consequent upon its removal would convert it into a fertilizer which would contain three or four times its amount if it was in its natural state. The washed marl would then possess the following composition: Phosphate of lime 2.50 Peroxide of iron and alumina, 25.00 Carbonate of lime 44.17 Magnesia, 1.71 Potash 2.85 Soda, 2.50 Sulphuric acid 0.72 Chlorine, 0.52 Organic matter 16.12 Soluble silica, 0.78 Water, 3.75 The commercial value of marl of this description will be from 8 to 9 cents per bushel. A bushel of dry marl weighing eighty pounds, and twenty-five bushels weighing two thousand pounds, it will be worth from $1 60 to $1 80 per ton. Fifty tons of marl might be washed per day, which would give about twelve tons of concentrated marl in the vats. The cost of raising and washing may be performed at from 37J to 50 cents per ton, and perhaps less than the lowest figure. 92. The washing of the marls should not be confined to the green sand marls, the white eocene marls upon the Nense in Craven county, may also be profitably subjected to the operation. It would at any rate improve it much, for agriculture, and serve to create a demand for it in the midland counties. Besides, when it has been subjected to this operation, it becomes an excellent material for burning into quick lime. Being in a fine incoherent state after washing, and also wet or a calcareous mud, it might be pressed at once by means of moulds into the form of large bricks, and when allowed to dry, put up in kilns for burning. In western New York, the white fresh water marl is treated in this way, with the exception that it does not require...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236545273
  • 9781236545275