Report of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners Upon a High-Level Gravity Sewer; For the Relief of the Charles and Neponset River Valleys. Resolves of 1898, Chapter 4. January, 1899 Volume 4

Report of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners Upon a High-Level Gravity Sewer; For the Relief of the Charles and Neponset River Valleys. Resolves of 1898, Chapter 4. January, 1899 Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...having a carrying capacity of about 130,000,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. Thus it is evident that a supplementary outfall for the highlevel system would be needed long before the expiration of the period for which that system is designed, if the high and low systems were combined at the outfall sewer of the Boston main drainage. It is therefore necessary to consider the practicability and cost of establishing a supplementary or independent reservoir and outfall at Moon Island for the high-level sewer. The area of Moon Island above high water is about 35 acres. About one-third of this area in the middle of this island is covered by the present reservoir and its extension. The high land at the east end of the island might be graded to a level of about 25 feet above low water. This would provide a site of about 20 acres for a reservoir of about 80,000,000 gallons capacity. The shallow water west of the present reservoir might be filled with earth from the hill. This, with 4 acres of land in that vicinity, would provide a site for a small reservoir of about 20,000,000 gallons capacity, but its cost would be relatively great. If the whole island were used for reservoirs, an aggregate storage capacity of about 130,000,000 gallons might be obtained, with the possibility of increasing it to about 150,000,000 gallons by constructing a small reservoir partly on filled land. A storage of 130,000,000 gallons during ten hours of each tide would provide for a flow of 312,000,000 gallons per twenty-four hours; and a storage of 150,000,000 gallons during ten hours of each tide would provide for a flow of 360,000,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. The maximum dryweather flow from the combined districts might not attain these volumes until after the year...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236590082
  • 9781236590084