Report of a Geological Survey of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota; And Incidentally of a Portion of Nebraska Territory. Made Under Instructions from the United States Treasury Department

Report of a Geological Survey of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota; And Incidentally of a Portion of Nebraska Territory. Made Under Instructions from the United States Treasury Department

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...sandy ridges begin, covered with a growth of small aspen, with an undergrowth of bass-wood. For the next five miles the country is gently undulating, with meadows in the valleys, and aspen, pine, birch, and cypress on the higher grounds, with an undergrowth of maple and bass-wood. Between three and five miles south of Red Lake, we passed three high barren ridges, and one low one, with very steep sides, and separated by narrow valleys. These ridges bear nearly northeast and southwest, and are composed of sand, intermingled with gravel and pebbles, derived from both crystalline and sedimentary rocks. The bases of these ridges are, probably, the extreme southwestern prolongations of the low granite ridges seen on Big Fork River, below the mouth of Opimabonowin River. North of the ridges is a valley about three-fourths of a mile wide, thickly covered with small cypress. The most northerly ridge (the one next to Red Lake) rises only eleven feet above the valley, and is very little higher than the land near the Lake shores. The next one south of it is fifty-three feet above the intervening valley; and the third one is sixty-six feet above a small stream which flows in the valley between it and the second one; while the summit of the fourth, or most southerly one, is eighty-two feet above the bottom of the valley between it and the third. These ridges are not timbered; only a little coarse grass and a few scattering bushes grow on them. The valleys support a small growth of such timber as was seen on the rolling lands immediately south of them. Very few boulders were seen in this section, and most of those noticed were derived from the metamorphic schistose rocks, such as were met with on Big Fork River, and along the northern line of exploration. Some...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 306 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 549g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236531930
  • 9781236531933