Report of the Committee on Water; Submitted to the Common Council, May 2, 1904, with Accompanying Papers and Exhibits Relating to Electrolytic Damage

Report of the Committee on Water; Submitted to the Common Council, May 2, 1904, with Accompanying Papers and Exhibits Relating to Electrolytic Damage

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...pipes can protect them against electrolytic injury from single trolley currents, but that there are two methods of operating electric railways by which the return currents can be kept out of the ground; namely, the conduit system as in use in Xew York City and in Washington, D. C, and the double overhead trolley system as operated in Cincinnati, Ohio, and on suburban lines in the District of Columbia. The conduit system is more expensive to construct, and is peculiarly adapted to the larger cities. The first cost of installing a double trolley system would be a little greater than that of a single trolley system for the same service; while the cost of converting an existing single trolley system to a double trolley system would be trifling, as compared with the enormous interests endangered by the single trolley current. Ten years' experience with the double trolley in Cincinnati proves that that system is entirely practical, possesses many advantages over the single trolley, is more economical in operation and maintenance, and that it completely stops the injury to the pipes. Your Committee, therefore, respectfully makes the following recommendations: 1. Street railway companies should be compelled, as are electric light companies, and all other electric power companies, to provide a complete metallic circuit for their current, absolutely insulated from the rails and ground. This will keep the return currents out of the ground and off the pipes, and can be accomplished either by the conduit system or by the double overhead trolley system. 2. No connections by which a current is carried to the pipe, or induced to flow thereon, should be allowed from pipes to rails, or to other return conductors; and no other alleged remedy which permits the mains...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236525043
  • 9781236525048