Report of the Commission to Inquire Into the Expediency of Revising and Amending the Laws of the Commonwealth Relating to Taxation, October 1897

Report of the Commission to Inquire Into the Expediency of Revising and Amending the Laws of the Commonwealth Relating to Taxation, October 1897

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...payer may either declare the value of the dwelling he occupies or leave it to be estimated by assessors; the matter being one which, in the majority of cases, can be so nearly estimated without declaration by the tax payer that it is not very material whether he hands in a statement or does not. It cannot be evaded except by change in the style of living, which few people, if any, would undertake because of a moderate tax. We have endeavored to provide, in the seeAppendu bill submitted, for the due assessment of persons dwelling in apartment houses and in hotels. We have provided also for the payment of two taxes in respect of house rentals by those persons who are so well-to-do as to occupy for their own use two separate houses in the Commonwealth; for the bill provides that (except in case of mere change of residence) occupancy of any dwelling for a period of three months or more shall be ground for the collection of the tax. Hence those who have winter and summer houses will pay this tax in both localities in which they reside. It may be objected that the tax is on real estate, and is additional to the taxes already levied on real estate. As to the owner of a dwelling who occupies it for his own use, it is true that he will pay not only the present taxes on the real estate but another tax based on the rental value of his house. But this additional tax is levied with respect to the income which he must have, if able to live in an expensive house. No one can own and occupy a house whose rental value is $600 or $800 or $1,000 a year, unless he has some considerable income from other sources; and on that income he may be fairly called on to pay a tax, if it be not unduly heavy, and be proportioned in some approximate way to his income. So...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236801105
  • 9781236801104