Report of the Arguments of Counsel in the Case of Prudence Crandall Plff. in Error vs. State of Connecticut Before the Supreme Court of Errors at Their Session at Brooklyn, July Term 1834

Report of the Arguments of Counsel in the Case of Prudence Crandall Plff. in Error vs. State of Connecticut Before the Supreme Court of Errors at Their Session at Brooklyn, July Term 1834

By (author) 

List price: US$14.15

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ...instrument. No person can be elected to the office of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or representative, unless he be an Elector, and none other than white male citizens can be made Electors.' These are the explicit provisions of the constitution of Connecticut, and now one branch of the government is solemnly called on to disregard the distinctions of color 1 Let us mark the provisions of the constitutions of other States. Delaware--In all elections, none but free white male citizens can vote. In Maryland--Every free white male citizen shall vote. In Virginia--' Every white male citizen of the Commonwealth resident therein, shall vote.' In South Carolina--' Every free white man may vote.' In Ohio--' All white male inhabitants shall vote.' In Louisiana--' Every free white male citizen of the U. S.' shall have right to vote. In Mississippi--' Every free white male person shall have right to vote.' In Illinois--'All white male inhabitants, resident, have right to vote.' In Alabama--' Every white male person shall vote.' Indiana--' Every white male citizen of the U. S. may vote.' Rhode Island has defined the qualification of freemen, and among these qualifications, a man must be white, in order to enjoy the elective franchise. In all these States, constitutional provisions forever cut off the colored man from the enjoyment of the ' immunity ' of voting for his rulers. By the constitution of the State of New-York, a singular disqualification exists. All white men who go into that State, can vote, after a residence of six months, but the colored man must have resided there three years, and possess, free from incumbrance, real estate to the value of $250. But it is said, that in relation to colored persons, that the constitution denominates them...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236595742
  • 9781236595744