Reply to Webster; A Letter to Daniel Webster in Reply to His Legal Opinion to Baring, Brothers & Co. Upon the Illegality and Unconstitutionality of State Bonds, and Loans of State Credit

Reply to Webster; A Letter to Daniel Webster in Reply to His Legal Opinion to Baring, Brothers & Co. Upon the Illegality and Unconstitutionality of State Bonds, and Loans of State Credit

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ... money then outstanding, valued at a depreciation of forty for one.--3 Lloyd's Deb. 282, 283, 288. "It is a part of our history," says the late Chief Justice Marshall, (in the case of Cohens v. Vir"ginia, 6 Wheaton's Rep. 264 a 392, ) "that, at the t "adoption of the constitution, all the states were "greatly indebted; and the apprehension that these j "debts might be prosecuted in the federal courts, ""formed a very serious objection to that instrument. "Suits were instituted, and the court maintained its "jurisdiction. The alarm was general, and, to "quiet the apprehensions that were so extensively "entertained, this amendment, (the eleventh) was "proposed in Congress, and adopted by the state "legislatures. That its motive was not to maintain "the sovereignty of a state from the degradation, "supposed to attend a compulsory appearance before "the tribunal of the nation, may be inferred from "the terms of the amendment. It does not com"prehend controversies between two or more states, "or between a state and a foreign state. The juris"diction of the court still extends to these cases; "and in these a state may still be sued. We must "ascribe the amendment, then, to some other cause, all that Congress or the states had to give. They never expected to be paid in full, nor even in part, unless the states should be prosperous, and able, and willing to pay them. The complaints of violation of public faith come not from the patriots of the revolution. They come from a very different class of people. They come from the cowboys and tories, the emissaries of mother Britain; who, half detected in laying up supplies for the British...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236593723
  • 9781236593726