Remarks on the Royal Supremacy as It Is Defined by Reason, History, and the Constitution; A Letter to the Lord Bishop of London

Remarks on the Royal Supremacy as It Is Defined by Reason, History, and the Constitution; A Letter to the Lord Bishop of London

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...proceeds to enact--"That all and singular persons, as well lay as those that be now married or hereafter shall be married, being doctors of the civil law.... which shall be made.... to be any chancellor, vicar-general, commissary, official, scribe, or register.... may lawfully execute and exercise all manner of jurisdiction commonly called ecclesiastical jurisdiction, and all censures and coercions appertaining or in anywise belonging unto the same, albeit such person or persons be lay, married or unmarried, so that they be doctors of the civil law, as is aforesaid." Thus it appears (1), that up to the year 1545, all ecclesiastical jurisdiction-notwithstanding the appointment of Cromwell--was commonly exercised by the clergy alone: (2), that an Act was thought necessary to legalise the exercise of it in any form by laymen: (3), that those laymen were to be none other than doctors of civil law. It appears indeed that the statute has been construed, notwithstanding the repeated words of limitation, as enabling all persons to hold the recited offices; and that such a construction is regarded with some wonder, as surely it well may be. To show the intention of the ruling powers during the subsequent reign, as to the final disposal of ecclesiastical causes--apparently of all causes so called, whether purely spiritual or not--we may well refer to the Reformatio Legum, which says, speaking of appealed causes brought into Chancery, "Quo cum fuerit causa devoluta, earn vel concilio provinciali definiri volumus, si gravis sit causa, vel a tribus quatuorve episcopis, a nobis ad id constituendis." Thus the very same document, which carries Stephens's Eccl. Stat., i. p. 289 n. t Ibid., i. 152 n. to the highest point the assertion...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236988914
  • 9781236988911