Religious Courtship; Being Historical Discourses of the Necessity of Marrying Religious Husbands and Wives Only as Also, of Husbands and Wives Being of the Same Opinion in Religion with One Another. with an Appendix Shewing the Necessity

Religious Courtship; Being Historical Discourses of the Necessity of Marrying Religious Husbands and Wives Only as Also, of Husbands and Wives Being of the Same Opinion in Religion with One Another. with an Appendix Shewing the Necessity

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ... upon religion, as well as upon your conduct. Yo. Sist. I told him, that, as the reason I had for using him so, was thus approved by himself, he bound me to preserve the same resolution, on the hazard of his having the less esteem for me. He confessed that was very true, unless he could convince me the cause was removed, which he saw no hopes of; and that was the reason that he came to visit me again, with so little encouragement, that he knew not what to think of it. Eld. Sist. What could he mean by that? why, sure, then all we have heard must be false, and he is the same man as ever. Yo.sist. I was greatly startled at his words, and looked steadily at him, but could judge nothing from his countenance: but it grew late, and he took his leave, falling into some other cursory talk, and left me, I confess, in the greatest confusion of thought imaginable; for I was dreadfully afraid he would declare himself to have no sense of religion on his mind still; and then I was in a worse condition than at first, having thus admitted a second treaty with him. Aunt. I thought, child, you was a little perplexed on Tuesday night; but I took it to be only a little thoughtfulness more than ordinary, which is usual on such occasions. k Ye. sist. When he came again the next night, he made a kind of an apology for having left me in more disorder than he used to do; For, to tell you true, madam, says he, I was not able to go on with what I was saying to you; neither am I now, says he, seeing I am come to wait on you, and yet have effectually shut the door against myself. I told him I did not, perhaps, rightly understand him, unless he would explain himself. Why, says he, I have first told you sincerely how absolutely I approve the resolution you took against me, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236549805
  • 9781236549808