The Religious Condition of Christendom, Exhibited in a Series of Papers, Prepared at the Instance of the British Organisation of the Evangelical Alliance, and Read 1851 Volume 1

The Religious Condition of Christendom, Exhibited in a Series of Papers, Prepared at the Instance of the British Organisation of the Evangelical Alliance, and Read 1851 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...with joy, not merely as a custom or form, but from feeling the actual need of it in their souls, the public services which are celebrated in their churches. Not satisfied with that, they delight for the most part in attending also private meetings for edification, which are held in almost all the churches where there is a truly faithful minister, and where there are truly converted souls. It is, however, to be regretted, that the habit of having evening services is not more common in France, and especially at Paris. The public celebration of the Sabbath is well begun there, but it is not concluded in so serious and impressive a manner as on the other side of the Channel. This, doubtless, results from the habits of our ancestors, who, persecuted at the origin of the Reformation, and even later, were compelled by prudence, and in order not to create suspicion, to avoid nightly meetings, and prefer assemblies by day. It results also from our family habits. In France, especially at Paris, dinner is at from six to seven o'clock in the evening; besides, the Sunday is the day in which the different members of a family generally like to unite and pass together the hours they would not so easily find disengaged during the week. Besides this, it must be admitted that our churches are hardly fit for evening services, and that it is generally very difficult to establish proper means for lighting them. It must, finally, be acknowledged, that in a town like Paris, where the mass of the population is very dissipated, and where the police has so much to do, services by lights, and in vast buildings especially, would not be without some inconvenience. These various reasons explain-why evening services have so little succeeded as yet, and why those...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 238 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 431g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236838009
  • 9781236838001