Religions of the Lower Culture. Section II. Religions of China and Japan. Section III. Religions of the Egyptians. Section IV. Religions of the Semites

Religions of the Lower Culture. Section II. Religions of China and Japan. Section III. Religions of the Egyptians. Section IV. Religions of the Semites

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...selfness in turn becomes identified with otherness. 25. Such is the significance of the deed growing out of the Wisdomheart. Let us reverently bow before the spiritual merit that extends over all beings who, thus received and embraced by all the Buddhas, are helped to cross over the stream. UPHOLDIN G AND GRATITUDE. 26. Sentient beings inhabiting this earth are destined by their Karma to have the Wisdom-heart awakened in them. Their wish to be born in this world is fulfilled: why should they not be thankful for having seen the Buddha? 27. Blessed indeed are we who have come in the days of the good Dharma. Does not the Buddha say, ' If one recognizes a master who teaches perfect wisdom, do not ask of what caste he is, do not attend to his outward features, do not consider his shortcomings or criticize his practices, revere his wisdom and bow before him respectfully three times a day ' ' --28. That we can see the Buddha and listen to his teachings is due to the transmission and maintenance of the good Dharma by our Buddhas and Patriarchs successively. We ought to be grateful for the gift of even one phrase or one portion of the Dharma. How much more ought we to be grateful for the incomparable gift of the eye-treasury of the good law. 29. The proper way to show our gratitude is by the righteous upholding of our daily life, not to waste it, not to spend (our time) selfishly. 30. Time passes more swiftly than a flying arrow. With whatever craft and contrivance, we are unable to restore one day that is gone by. A life of one hundred years spent in idleness is indeed a sorrowful existence. A man may live as the slave of the senses for one hundred years, only let him succeed in upholding one day of his life in the Law, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236874641
  • 9781236874641