Religion and Policy and the Countenance and Assistance Each Should Give to the Other; With a Survey of the Power and Jurisdiction of the Pope in the Dominions of Other Princes Volume N . 1

Religion and Policy and the Countenance and Assistance Each Should Give to the Other; With a Survey of the Power and Jurisdiction of the Pope in the Dominions of Other Princes Volume N . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ...and return ed again to Avignon. Having thus provided for the liberty and security of the ambassadors, he prosecuted as vigorously and as passionately the vindication of his own honour; and caused all those of his own family, or of dependance upon him, of what quality soever, and against all the importunity that could be used, to be condemned and executed. Some were hanged before the gate of the house from whence the ambassadors had by force been taken out, and others in other places of the city; and because his Mareschal, (who had been much in his favour, ) when he found that the Pope could not be prevailed with on his behalf, to prevent the public disgrace, had killed himself, sentence was pronounced against him after he was dead, and his body deprived of Christian burial, and hanged up in the fields in the public place of execution, " inclusum in una theca ligned, inter duas "bigas appensd ad terrorem aliorum." By this exemplary justice (which made a good noise in the world) Benedict XII. freed himself from all suspicion of partiality; and though Philip (it may be) would have been better pleased if he had been so, yet he was thought to have much the more reverence for him. Interdict of When Edward the Third assumed the title of wwnsnin K-mg of France, and called Philip only Count de Flanders. Valois, and by that name sent him a challenge to fight singly with him, or each to bring two hundred knights, some towns of Flanders, (as Lisle, Douay, and Orchiers, ) partly out of displeasure to their own Earl, and partly out of their inclination to Edward, (to whom the Flemings were generally well affected, ) opened opened their gates and proclaimed Edward for their CHAP, King, and took an oath of fidelity to him; with-' which Philip was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236522303
  • 9781236522306