Register of Debates in Congress; Comprising the Leading Debates and Incidents of the Second Session of the Eighteenth Congress Volume 6, PT. 1

Register of Debates in Congress; Comprising the Leading Debates and Incidents of the Second Session of the Eighteenth Congress Volume 6, PT. 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...to them as hunting grounds; and the intercourse act, of 1790, was passed to enforce this violation of State sovereignty. What did Georgia do on this palpable violation of her admitted right? Animated by a love of the Union, by her respect for the peace and tranquillity of the country, to which her just claims had been unconstitutionally surrendered, she used no violence, she sought no redress by unhallowed means. She came here, sir, to protest against this new treaty, and against the law of 1790, as equally repugnant to her claims and to the constitution, r the Umted States. She hoped for indemnity. It never was made. We have the satisfaction to see, upon the public records, the acknowledgment that our complaints were just. A committee of Congress reported that injustice bad been done to the State, and that mdemnity was due. In the compact of 1802, there is found the admission of the United States that lands, formerly ceded by the Creeks to the State, had been taken, without eijuiSenate. The Indians. april 15, 1830. valent, from tile State. Without authority under the con stitution, it certainly was wrested from us. I ask the ho norablc Senators from the East what would have been the conduct of one of the New Kngland States, had a similar surrender of their territory been made, even under the pressure of dire necessity, to a foreign government' What is the feeling of the East on this point may be learned from the correspondence of the Governor of Maine, and the late Secretary of State, on the Northeastern boundary of the United States, now a question of arbitration witl Great Britain. An inspection of that correspondence will show that some warmth is felt, even in the cold regions olj the North. The blood can run amidst the snows of Maine, in a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 866 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 43mm | 1,515g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123663084X
  • 9781236630841