Reflexions on the Revolution in France, and on the Proccedings in Certain Societies in London, Relative to That Event, in a Letter Intended to Have Been Sent to a Gentleman in Paris, by Edmund Burte

Reflexions on the Revolution in France, and on the Proccedings in Certain Societies in London, Relative to That Event, in a Letter Intended to Have Been Sent to a Gentleman in Paris, by Edmund Burte

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1790 edition. Excerpt: ...first stated by Mr. Necker. Let us In the_ constitution of Scotland during the Stuart reigns, a committec sat for preparing bills; and none could pass, but those previoully approved by them. This committee was _calleddords of 'ai.ticles.-r N ' Perhaps ' Perhaps persons; unacquainted with the state of France, on hearing the clergyand the noblesse were privileged 'in point of taxation, may 'be led to imagine, that previous to the revolution these bodies had contributed nothing' to the state. ' This is a greatmistake. They certainly 'did not contribute equally with each other, nor either of them equally with the commons'. They both however contributed largely. Neither nobility nor clergy 'enjoyed any exemption from the excise on or from any of the other numerous indirect' imposi_tions, which in France as well as here, make so very large-a proportion of all payments to the public. The noblesse paid the capitation. They paid also' a land-tax, called the twentieth penny, 'to_the height sometimes of' three; sometimes of sour shillings in the pound; both of them direct impositions of no_ light nature, and no trivial produce, The clergy of the i provinces an-n nexed by conq'uest to France (which in' extent make about an eighth' part of the whole butlin 'wealth a much larger proportion) paid likewise 'to the 'capitation and-the; twentieth penny, at 'the rate paid by the nobilit_y. 'The clergy in the old provinces did not pay the capitation; but they redeemed 'themselvesat the ear? 'pence of about 24 triillions, or a little more than a million ste'rling. They were exempted from the twlesintieths; but thenthey made fl-ee gifts; they contracted debts 'for the state;' and wholeflcomputed at about a thirteenth part of ' thfieir they: contracted anew...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236889355
  • 9781236889355