Reflexions Upon Ridicule; Or, What It Is That Makes a Man Ridiculous, and the Means to Avoid It. Wherein Are Represented the Different Manners and Cha

Reflexions Upon Ridicule; Or, What It Is That Makes a Man Ridiculous, and the Means to Avoid It. Wherein Are Represented the Different Manners and Cha

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1717 edition. Excerpt: ...uncapable of seeing one another winh the same Pleasure and Freedom. There's a fort of Charm in Complaisance which there's no resisting. Our Affections easily stream towards the gentle and good humour d, that enter into our Sentiments, applaud all we Jayj.and are not disheartned with our Caprices and. ill Humours. However, J;hfie good-natur'd Folks are to be advis'd, that an extravagant gant Complaisance breeds Weariness and Contempt. Tis ra.ther Flattery and Folly, than Complaisance, not to dare to-contradict People stupidly venting their Extravagances, and making themselves ridiculous by the Fooleries that escape them. Cmplaisance has its Boundaries as well as other Virtues; and 'tis turning Fool to approve Impertinences, and extol the Follies of a Man we are making court to. A Per-. son well known in the World by bis Post and Quality, turns all his Discourse into Panegyrick. He commends the Elbow-Chair, and the Hand-Skreen you give him; he.admires the situation of the Chamber, praises the inlaid Floor, the Bed, the Alcove, the Qeling: he dwells upon the Riches and Magnificence of the Owner, his Equipage and Expences; nay 'tis much if he does not make trie Panegyrick extend even to the Horses: I heard him once commend the good Grace of a one-ey'd crooked Child. He has the fame Indulgence for the Productions of Wit; every thing charms and transports him; the jingle of a trivial Epigram, is, with him, preferable to all the fine Sentences in Juvenal. He: counterfeits Rap-. ture to please the Author, whq takes all his hyperbolical Praises for.current Coin; but by Misfortune he bestows it-as liberally on a Coxcomb, as a Man of Honour. This is not the. Complaisance becoming Men of Worth, Nothing renders a Man-more agreeable, nor. makes, h.ira more...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236535596
  • 9781236535597