Reflections on the Trial of the Prince de Polignac and His Colleagues, the Last Ministers of Charles the Tenth; Before the Chamber of Peers of France in 1830. with Some Notice of the Law of Treason in France, England, and the United

Reflections on the Trial of the Prince de Polignac and His Colleagues, the Last Ministers of Charles the Tenth; Before the Chamber of Peers of France in 1830. with Some Notice of the Law of Treason in France, England, and the United

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ... July? M. Beranger contends that the only danger consisted in the loss of their places, and that it was their duty, as ministers of a constitutional government, to resign when they found that they did not possess the confidence of the chamber of deputies. That such was their duty it is impossible to deny, and much is it to be regretted that they did not resolutely perform it. By so doing, they would have thrown the responsibility of resistance upon their opponents, and perhaps discomfited the preparations for revolt, which no doubt had been long in progress. Adhering, as I desire most strictly to do, to the principle with which I set out, that of examining, as a matter of legal investigation, the question of the guilt or innocence of the ministers, I cannot consent to go into any detail of the acknowledgments of the existence of previous conspiracies to overthrow the dynasty, which have since been made by some of the more violent leaders of the revolution. That the king and his ministers firmly believed that not the ministry only, but the throne was attacked, seems to me abundantly established by the arguments and the evidence taken before the Chamber of Peers; but I must decline_to enter into a discussion which would of necessity give to this attempt at impartial inquiry the complexion of party bias. It can give offence, however, to no one into whose hands this letter may chance to fall, and it is due to the unhappy men, whose punishment, in my humble judgment, has already been much greater than their offence, that I should not altogether suppress the defence which M. de Martignac puts into the mouth of his noble and unfortunate client: --" The King's government, until the year 1827, had maintained a system at once legal and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236578449
  • 9781236578440