Reeves' History of the English Law, from the Time of the Romans to the End of the Reign of Elizabeth [1603]; With Numerous Notes, and an Introductory Dissertation on the Nature and Use of Legal History, the Rise and Progress of Volume 1

Reeves' History of the English Law, from the Time of the Romans to the End of the Reign of Elizabeth [1603]; With Numerous Notes, and an Introductory Dissertation on the Nature and Use of Legal History, the Rise and Progress of Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...(c. 6). And one weight and measure were established throughout the realm., best beast? It was directed, that if a man died intestate, his children should divide the inheritance equally.' It was strictly enjoined that no one omit paying the due services to his lord, on pretence of any former indulgence.5 A regulation was made respecting namium, or, as it has since been called, a distress, a kind of remedy which, accordin to some, was introduced by the Normans, and accor ing to others was before in use here. It was directed,6 that a namtum should not be taken till right had been demanded three times in the county or hundred court; and if the party did not appear on the fourth day appointed, that the complainant should have leave of court to take a namium or distress sufiicient to make him full amends. Thus this summary remedy was considered only in the light of a compulsory process, and was therefore called districtio (and thence in after-times distress), from dtstrtngere, which in the barbarous latinity of those days, signified to compel. The remarkable law made by Canute in protection of his Danes was adopted by William, in favor of his own subjects. He ordained7 that where a Frenchman8 was killed, and the people of the hundred had not apprehended the slayer and brought him to justice within eight days, they should pay forty-seven marks, which fine was called murdrum. By virtue of this, presentments of Englishery were made; and all the former law upon the subject was continued, with the single difference of putting Frenchman in the place of Dane. Villiam forbade all punishments by hanging, or any other kind of death; and substituted in the place of it several kinds of mutilation; as the putting out of eyes, cutting off the hands or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 230 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 417g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236830830
  • 9781236830838