Recreative Minds

Recreative Minds : Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology

3.81 (11 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon recent theories and results in psychology. Ideas about how we read the minds of others have put the concept of imagination firmly back on the agenda for philosophy and psychology. Currie and Ravenscroft present a theory of what they call imaginative projection; they show how it fits into a philosophically motivated picture of the mind and of mental states, and how it illuminates
and is illuminated by recent developments in cognitive psychology. They argue that we need to recognize a category of desire-in-imagination, and that supposition and fantasy should be classed as forms of imagination. They accommodate some of the peculiarities of perceptual forms of imagining such as visual
and motor imagery, and suggest that they are important for mind-reading. They argue for a novel view about the relations between imagination and pretence, and suggest that imagining can be, but need not be, the cause of pretending. They show how the theory accommodates but goes beyond the idea of mental simulation, and argue that the contrast between simulation and theory is neither exclusive nor exhaustive. They argue that we can understand certain developmental and psychiatric disorders as
arising from faulty imagination. Throughout, they link their discussion to the uses of imagination in our encounters with art, and they conclude with a chapter on responses to tragedy. The final chapter also offers a theory of the emotions that suggests that these states have much in common with
perceptual states.
Currie and Ravenscroft offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject, for readers in philosophy, psychology, and aesthetics.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 244 pages
  • 156 x 233 x 14mm | 356g
  • Clarendon Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0198238096
  • 9780198238096
  • 863,097

Table of contents

1. PROJECTIONS AND RECREATIONS ; 3. THE SIMULATION PROGRAM ; 6. IMPRACTICAL REASON ; 9. EMOTION AND THE FICTIONAL
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Review Text

Recreative Minds is an insightful and wide-ranging discussion of the nature of imagination and its role in human cognition. Topics covered include the distinctions amongst different kinds of imagining (for example, between belief-like imaginings and perception-like imaginings), the mechanisms underlying visual and motor imagery, the role of emagination in mind-reading (that is, in mental-state attribution), the nature and developmental significance of childhood pretence, our emotional responses to literature and theatre, and explanations of autism and schizophrenia as (distinct) kinds of disorder of the imagination. Currie and Ravenscroft write clearly and engagingly throughout, and their careful dissection of many of the issues and arguments that they consider is quite masterful. The book deserves to be widely read by both philosophers and psychologists interested in any of the above topics. Peter Carruthers, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
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Review quote

an excellent and wide-ranging discussion of the character and role of the imagination: read it and profit * Peter Carruthers, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews * Recreative Minds is an insightful and wide-ranging discussion of the nature of imagination and its role in human cognition. Topics covered include the distinctions amongst different kinds of imagining (for example, between belief-like imaginings and perception-like imaginings), the mechanisms underlying visual and motor imagery, the role of emagination in mind-reading (that is, in mental-state attribution), the nature and developmental significance of
childhood pretence, our emotional responses to literature and theatre, and explanations of autism and schizophrenia as (distinct) kinds of disorder of the imagination. Currie and Ravenscroft write clearly and engagingly throughout, and their careful dissection of many of the issues and arguments that they consider
is quite masterful. The book deserves to be widely read by both philosophers and psychologists interested in any of the above topics. * Peter Carruthers, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews *
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Rating details

11 ratings
3.81 out of 5 stars
5 18% (2)
4 55% (6)
3 18% (2)
2 9% (1)
1 0% (0)
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