Record of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New York; Begun and Held at the Capitol in the City of Albany on Tuesday the Sixth Day of April Volume 1

Record of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New York; Begun and Held at the Capitol in the City of Albany on Tuesday the Sixth Day of April Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...to accede to the demands of the minority. When the large States demanded that the small States yield and give up their scheme, Mr. Bedford, of Delaware, rose and said: "The little States are willing to observe their engagement but will meet the larger States on no ground but that of the Confederation. We have been told with a dictatorial air that this is the last moment for a fair trial of a good government. It will be the last, indeed, if the propositions reported from the committee go forth to the people. The large States dare not dissolve the Confederation. If they do, the small ones will find some foreign ally, of more honor and good faith, who will take them by the hand and do them justice." That was the problem that confronted the Constitution makers when they sat in that great Convention to frame the great Constitution under which we govern ourselves to-day. as that the situation in 1Sfl4? Were we confronted with that problem or a problem of that kind. Was there any question of secession before the Convention? Was there a question of dissolution? 'as there a question of territorial rights? Was there a question there other than that one section of the State, containing a majority of the voting population, should be deprived of its right to equal representation? Was it not purely a political proposition, and was not that the only basis for it? It was, and that I contend with all the earnestness that I can control. That there is no parallel between that provision of the Constitution and the situation presented in our Constitution in 1894, and which certain members of this body are seeking to perpetuate in this present Constitution is obvious. I go into discussion of this proposition, gentlemen, because in the Committee room when this matter...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 592 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,043g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236657314
  • 9781236657312