Recollections of General Garibaldi, Or, Travels from Rome to Lucerne; Comprising a Visit to the Mediterranean Isles of La Maddalena and Caprera, and G

Recollections of General Garibaldi, Or, Travels from Rome to Lucerne; Comprising a Visit to the Mediterranean Isles of La Maddalena and Caprera, and G

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ...on a proud mare, exhibiting the art of equitation; and it was wonderful to see how, without spur, or even a switch, but only with a slight pressure of his leg, he put the elegant "Vittoria" through all her paces! Two days later, and I was mounting Ballerino, at Susa, on a fine morning, just as the sun was overcoming the cool freshness of the night air, and commencing my ascent of Mount Cenis. This pass of the Alps, though most in use, is certainly the longest and the least interesting of any. But if it offer to the epicurean tourist no "Via Mala," no "Devil's Bridge," no "Priest's Leap," and such like fantastic scenes, the true lover of true nature will still find in it a rich repast, as, step by step, he follows a road abounding in curves and windings, and defiles of every kind, until, from a height of 7000 feet, his astounded gaze seems to light upon a new zone. And is not the road itself an object of admi ration and wonderment, as a monument of the imperial engineer, Napoleon? At his command it was begun in 1803, and finished in 1810, at an expenditure of seven millions and a half of francs. An inn, called the "Grande Croix," and a group of buildings for the use of guides and muleteers, showed me that I was at the highest point of the pass. The perpetual wind that blows on every mountain top greeted us with true alpine severity as we rode along the little plain at the extremity of which stands the Hospice, founded in the ninth century by Charles the Great, who crossed the mountain with his whole army. The present building is the work of Napoleon. One-half of it is inhabited by a corps of carabineers, whose duty is to examine passports; and the other half by a few Benedictine monks, who dispense...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579992
  • 9781236579997