Recollections of a Forest Life, Or, the Life and Travels of Kah-GE-Ga-Gah-Bowh, or George Copway, Chief of the Ojibway Nation

Recollections of a Forest Life, Or, the Life and Travels of Kah-GE-Ga-Gah-Bowh, or George Copway, Chief of the Ojibway Nation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...miles per day, and arrived home at noon, on the fourth day; having walked two hundred and forty miles, forded eight large streams, and crossed the broad Mississippi twice. My coat and pantaloons were in strips. I crossed the Mississippi just in front of our missionhouse, and, as soon as possible, I told the chief that the war party were now on their way to our mission, to kill them. I advised him to lead away the women and children, which they did, and the next day they all left us. We, that is, my family, myself, and the other missionaries, were now left to the mercy of the Sioux. But they did not come, although they sent spies. Brother 13race, cousin Johnson, and I, now ventured to take our families down to St. Peter's. We left in a large bark canoe, and had only one loaf of bread, two quarts of beans, and two quarts of molasses. Brother Brace was so sick, that we had to lift him in and out of the canoe. We saw tracks of the war party on our way to St. Peter's. They watched us on the river, as we heard afterwards. We encamped about one mile and a half this side of their watering place, during the night, and did nut know that they knew this fact, as will be seen in the sequel. They came and held a council just across the river from our encampment; they could see the light of our tire. The war chiefs agreed that four of the warriors should swim over to us and take us all prisoners. One was to take the canoe to the other side of the river, to bring over the rest of the party. They were to "kill me and my cousin Johnson. But the chief said to them, "If you kill these men, the Great Spirit will be angry, and he will send his white children to kill us and our children." One of the warriors told the chief that he was a coward, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236842650
  • 9781236842657