Real Electric Toy-Making for Boys; Containing Complete Directions for Making and Using a Large Number of Simple Toys That Are Operated by Electricity and Magnetism

Real Electric Toy-Making for Boys; Containing Complete Directions for Making and Using a Large Number of Simple Toys That Are Operated by Electricity and Magnetism

By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...the armature without changing the field. 177. Connections for Reversing Motors. Fig. 66 shows how ordinary toy motors are generally wound. If the current be allowed to enter at binding-post R it will pass through the armature and then through the field to binding-post L, the armature and field being in series. Fig. 67 shows how the two wires from the field may be connected to the two binding-posts of the motor, and how two other wires may be led from the armature to A and B, which may be home-made binding-posts. With this arrangement the current may be reversed in either the field or the armature. Fig. 68 shows how the current from two dry cells may be divided in order to complete connections for reversing R a toy motor. A part of the current passes from the carbon along wire C and goes directly to binding-post A, then through the armature and back to the battery by way of binding-post B and wire Z. Branch wires, E and F, are attached to C and Z as shown. The ends of E and F may be connected to either R or L as desired. When E and F are connected respectively to R and L, the motor will run in one direction. If E and F be reversed upon R and L the motor will also be reversed. The best way to quickly reverse the part of the current that passes through the field by the way of R and L is to connecct some form of current reverser between the two wires, E, F, and the binding-posts, R, L. (See Apparatus Book, Chapter XVI., for Home-made Reversers.) I78. Load on Motors. When a motor is simply connected to a battery and runs at high speed, we say that it has no load; that is, it has no outside work to do. It really has some work, for it has to overcome the friction of its shaft in its bearings, and the resistance of the air to its rapidly..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236608585
  • 9781236608581