Reading the Book of Nature

Reading the Book of Nature : A Phenomenological Study of Creative Expression in Science and Painting

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Description

Edwin Jones sets out to show that a phenomenological analysis of meaning can contribute to a theory of creativity in several ways. It can clarify the concept of creative expression and resolve its paradoxical appearance. Creativity must have its roots in already existing meanings and at the same time has to generate new meanings. To illustrate, Jones shows that a phenomenological analysis can render more comprehensible the spiritual dilemma suffered by C\u00e9zanne. The artist could not render intellectually understandable to himself what he was attempting as an artist. A phenomenological approach shows, according to Jones, that the dilemma was generated in C\u00e9zanne's mind in part by a certain implicit Galilean concept of Nature that C\u00e9zanne brought to his work -- a concept that phenomenology has only recently begun to dispel by demonstrating a parallel between creativity in philosophy and creativity in art. Jones employs Heidegger and C\u00e9zanne as concrete examples and Husserl and Merleau-Ponty as other important elements in his essay. Ultimately, Jones argues for a parallel between creativity in science and philosophy, and creativity in the arts.
His is an original synthesis of the work of the three thinkers he interprets and of C\u00e9zanne's late work, and his study should be of considerable interest to philosophers, art critics, and artists of a theoretical or reflective bent.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 178 pages
  • 157.73 x 235.97 x 18.29mm | 476.27g
  • Athens, United States
  • English
  • 1col.ill.
  • 0821409085
  • 9780821409084

About Edwin Jones

Edwin Jones sets out to show that a phenomenological analysis of meaning can contribute to a theory of creativity in several ways. It can clarify the concept of creative expression and resolve its paradoxical appearance. Creativity must have its roots in already existing meanings and at the same time has to generate new meanings.


To illustrate, Jones shows that a phenomenological analysis can render more comprehensible the spiritual dilemma suffered by Cezanne. The artist could not render intellectually understandable to himself what he was attempting as an artist. A phenomenological approach shows, according to Jones, that the dilemma was generated in Cezanne's mind in part by a certain implicit Galilean concept of Nature that Cezanne brought to his work - a concept that phenomenology has only recently begun to dispel by demonstrating a parallel between creativity in philosophy and creativity in art. Jones employs Heidegger and Cezanne as concrete examples and Husserl and Merleau-Ponty as other important elements in his essay.


Ultimately, Jones argues for a parallel between creativity in science and philosophy, and creativity in the arts. His is an original synthesis of the work of the three thinkers he interprets and of Cezanne's late work, and his study should be of considerable interest to philosophers, art critics, and artists of a theoretical or reflective bent.
show more