Railroad Valuations; A Treatise on Methods for the Valuation of Property of Common Carriers, Based on the Specifications of the Valuation ACT and the Decision of the United States Supreme Court Volume 1

Railroad Valuations; A Treatise on Methods for the Valuation of Property of Common Carriers, Based on the Specifications of the Valuation ACT and the Decision of the United States Supreme Court Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$11.93

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...irrespective of State lines. The force of these contentions is emphasized in these cases, and in others of like nature, by the extreme difficulty and intricacy of the calculations which must be made in the effort to establish a segregation of intrastate business for the purpose of determining the return to which the carrier is properly entitled therefrom." THE VALUE OF EQUIPMENT. The equipment of a railroad furnishes a concrete example of physical property having other values and elements of value outside of its mere cost or market value. Without equipment the railroad could not be thrown into motion, while on the other hand the equipment without wheels would become like so many buildings--a fixed part of real estate. The value of a piece of Value should be apportioned to the kind of business done. Further element of value. Value of equipment. Equipment limited in amount. Moving equipment idsnt ifles property used in valuations. equipment to a railroad is not to be determined in the same manner as though it was a building or a piece of real estate, for its value to the railroad comes through its movable qualities. The value of its transporting elements may be as readily detected and measured as are its cost elements of construction. As, for instance, assume that a carload of freight is to be sent from Maine to California and thereby traverses the lines of four carriers. It is obvious that if the contents of every car of freight destined to such remote points had to be transferred to the carsof each separate carrier, the cost of transfers would soon eat up the value of the car. In considering such costs not only is the actual transfer of the freight from one car to the other to be taken into account, but the necessary shifting and...
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123688650X
  • 9781236886507