Radio Communication Laws of the United States and the International Radio-Telegraphic Convention; Regulations Governing Radio Operators and the Use of Radio Apparatus on Ships and on Land

Radio Communication Laws of the United States and the International Radio-Telegraphic Convention; Regulations Governing Radio Operators and the Use of Radio Apparatus on Ships and on Land

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...call for test messages, to be sent by means of the emergency apparatus, while the vessel is at sea. 6. An "induction coil" connected to "plain aerial" is not recommended as emergency apparatus, on account of the high voltages produced which frequently damage the antenna insulation and on account of "vibrator troubles." 7. A motor generator or rotary converter operated by storage battery is probably the most satisfactory means available at present of energizing the transmitting apparatus. operate on a fuel which will fulfill the requirements of Rule XI, section 5, of the General Rules and Regulations of the Steamboat-Inspection Service, reading as follows: None of the inflammable articles specified in section 4472, Revised Statutes, or oil that will not stand a fire test of 300 P. shall be used as stores on any pleasure steamer or steamer carrying passengers except that vessels not carrying passengers for hire may transport gasoline or any of the products of petroleum for use as a source of motive power for motor boats or launches of such vessels. (Sec. 4472, R. S.) 133138--19 4 49 8. Any auxiliary wireless purposes must repateepartsand 9. Every ship station shall carry a reasonable number of spares of such parts of both the main and emergency radiotelegraph equipments as are subject to undue wear, deterioration, or liability to accident. 10. One extra pair of head telephones, extra cords, and extra detectors must always be Kept on hand. 11. A storage battery voltmeter, hydrometer, a supply of electrolyte, and distilled water should be a part of the regular equipment, but are not prescribed in terms by statute. The absence of these and similar inexpensive emergency articles will be brought to the attention of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236894766
  • 9781236894762