Radford's Cyclopedia of Construction; Carpentry, Building and Architecture, Based on the Practical Experience of a Large Staff of Experts in Actual Co

Radford's Cyclopedia of Construction; Carpentry, Building and Architecture, Based on the Practical Experience of a Large Staff of Experts in Actual Co

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...and which is stressed by being bent. 31. Classes of Beams. Beams or girders are divided into several classes, according to the manner in which their ends rest or are fixed on the supports. These classes are: 1. Simple beams, or beams which have the ends resting freely on two supports (Fig. 24). 2. Cantilever beams, or beams which rest on one support only. Ofttimes cantilever beams have the second half built in a wall, one half only being used (Fig. 25). Fig. 26. Overhanging Beam. Fig. 27. Continuous Beam. 3. Overhanging beams, which are a combination of classes 1 and 2 (Fig. 26). 4. Continuous beams, or beams which rest on more than two supports (Fig. 27). Fig. 28. Restrained Beam. 5. Restrained beams, which rest on two supports, but have their ends fixed so that they are immovable (Fig. 28). 6. Hybrid beams, which are beams combining the characteristics of two or more of the above classes of beams. Simple beams are used to a far greater extent than all other classes put together. In their case, it is comparatively easy to analyze and calculate stresses; and it requires no heavy construction to hold the ends of such beams, since they are perfectly free to move on their supports. Overhanging beams are seldom used. They are, as will readily be seen, a combination of simple beams with cantilevers at the ends. The method of determining the stresses in them is more complicated than in the case of simple beams; but the design of overhanging beams--and, in fact, of all the other types of beams--is as simple as the design of the simple beam itself, once the stresses are obtained. Continuous beams are seldom used. The computation of the stresses in them is quite complex. Also, the supports must always remain at the same elevation as when first built; for, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581679
  • 9781236581679