In Q. Caecilium Divinatio and in C. Verrem Actio Prima

In Q. Caecilium Divinatio and in C. Verrem Actio Prima

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...at Rome. 7 hey were seeking the protection If laws against extortion 11/hich were es; ecial/y framed for the benefit of the provinces; and they mzlght fairly claim to be represented by the advocate on whom they coutd depend, especial/y as they were thoroughly acquainted with both the men who sought the oifas and had as good reasons for objecting to Caedlius as they had for trusting Cicero. 1. 20. Illud, ' the following point, ' as l hoc ' is the request which has already been considered. 1. a3. In suo iure repetundo, 'in recovering their rights, ' which had been as much infringed by verres as their property had been stolen. 1. 25. Tota lex. The first law de repetundis pecuniis was the Lex Calpumia, proposed by L. Calpumius Piso, tribune of the commons, in B.C. um which seems to have been confined in its operations exclusively, though perhaps not forinally, to redressing wrongs done by Roman magistrates in the provinces. Citi2ens would have other remedies in the civil courts for acts of extortion on the part of magistrates at home (see s 18), though they would equally have the right of instituting criminal proceedings de pecuniis repetundis. This law was followed about B.C. 1oq by the Lex Servilia, which made the process in such cases more lengthy, by granting the right of ' comperendinatio' (see note on verr. 1. 1l, 34). This was however removed by the lxx Acilia in B.C. 1o1g and again restored by the Lex Cornelia in B. C. 81, which was the law in force at the time of the present tria1. 1. ar Civili fere actione, ' by an action brought in his own name as a private citi2en'g i. e. by an action for the recovery of his money and for personal compensation, 1ot by a criminal prosecution....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236778057
  • 9781236778055