Public Documents Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States, During the Second Session of the Twenty-Sixth Congress Begun and Held at the City of Washington, December 1, 1840, and in the Sixty-Fifht Year of the Independence of

Public Documents Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States, During the Second Session of the Twenty-Sixth Congress Begun and Held at the City of Washington, December 1, 1840, and in the Sixty-Fifht Year of the Independence of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ... Indians living on the Mississippi assembled, last spring, - organize for removal, at their own special request permission was granted to make another crop at their old fields. The bands from the Wiskonsm would, of conrse, disincline to prosecute their journey, leaving so great a portion of their people behind. They were also permitted to remain on the west bank ol the Mississippi till fall, when it was understood all would emigrate together, beyond the limits of the twenty miles ceded to the United States in the treaty of 1837. It is to be regretted that these Indians now insist on remaining in their present position, pretending to consider their emigration as complete. It is inferred, however, that sucli is not the view of the department; as I have been recently instructed to " prepare and forward estimates of the probable cost of their entire removal." I am also informed, by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, in a letter under date 13th May last, that " the only location. the Winnebagoes have any right to, or can, under the treaty of 1837, be placed upon, is the tract of land that lies between a line twenty miles west of the Mississippi river, and a line running with the eastern branch of the Red Cedar river, extending, in either case, across the Neutral Ground." This accords with my own opinion, which had been expressed to the Indians previous to the arrival of this advice. They, however, (particularly those from Kort Winnebago, ) seem to become more and more reluctant to leave the Mississippi, as the stipulated time for doing so approaches; and 1 have no doubt but the influence of troops will be again necessary to put ihcm in motion, as well as to confine them to their proper country after having been placed there....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 517g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236634527
  • 9781236634528