Pseudodoxia Epidemica, Books V-VII. Religio Medici. the Garden of Cyprus

Pseudodoxia Epidemica, Books V-VII. Religio Medici. the Garden of Cyprus

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...that are obtruded, so is it also in matters of common belief; whereunto neither can we indubitably assent, without the co-operation of our sense or reason, wherein consist the principles of persuasion. For, as the habit of faith in divinit is an argument of things unseen, and a stable assent unto t ' gs inevident, upon authority of the Divine Bevealer, ---so the belief of man, which depends upon human testimony, is but a staggering assent unto the afiirmative, not without some fear of the negative. And as there is required the Word of God, or infused inclination unto the one, so must the actual sensation of our senses at least the non-opposition of our reasons, procure our assent and acquiescence in the other. So when Eusebius, an holy writer, aflirmeth, there grew a strange and unknown plant near the statue of Christ, erected by his hzemorrhoidal patient in the gospel, which attaining unto the hem of his vesture, acquired a sudden faculty to cure all diseases; although,3 he saith, he saw the statue in his days, et hath it not found in many men so much as human belief. Some believing, others opinioning, a third suspecting it might be otherwise. For indeed, in matters of belief, the understanding assenting unto the relation, either for the authority of the person, or the probability of the object, although there may be a confidence of the one, yet if there be not a satisfaction in the other, there will arise suspensions; nor can we properly believe until some argument of reason, or of our proper sense, convince or determine our dubitations. 2 sensea And that this was not wanting to make good the storye in parte, is evident in the very next section.---Wr. 3 although, &: c. Why may wee not beleave that there was such a plant at the foote.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 218 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236789601
  • 9781236789600