Psalmfest
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Psalmfest : Vocal score

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Description

for soprano and tenor soloists and SATB choir, with keyboard or chamber ensemble or orchestra The nine movements form a single choral work comprising seven pieces previously published separately and two new movements. A broad range of emotions all find their place with rich and varied musical settings. Instrumental material and vocal scores are available on hire.show more

Product details

  • Sheet music | 96 pages
  • 214 x 276 x 8mm | 281.23g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0193380404
  • 9780193380400
  • 2,003,439

About John Rutter

John Rutter was born in London in 1945 and studied music at Clare College, Cambridge. His compositions embrace choral, orchestral, and instrumental music, and he has edited or co-edited various choral anthologies, including four Carols for Choirs volumes with Sir David Willcocks and the Oxford Choral Classics series. From 1975 to 1979 he was Director of Music at Clare College, and in 1981 he formed his own choir, the Cambridge Singers. He now divides his time between composition and conducting and is sought after as a guest conductor for the world's leading choirs and orchestras.show more

Table of contents

O be joyful in the Lord ; I will lift up mine eyes ; Praise the Lord, O my soul ; The Lord is my shepherd ; Cantate Domino ; The Lord is my light and my salvation ; O clap your hands ; O how amiable are thy dwellings ; O praise the Lord of heavenshow more

Review quote

Compiled as it is from originally disparate elements, Psalmfest hangs together as a unity remarkably well. This is due partly to selection of material and judicious orchestration - always a Rutter strong point - and partly to the composer's tendency to respond to broadly similar texts in similar ways . . . Of the newly-composed material, the concluding 'O praise the Lord of heaven' (Psalm 148) takes the palm for its sparkling rhythms and effective antiphonal use of double choir . . . The choral parts in Psalmfest are well within the means of any moderately competent choir . . . I see no reason why Psalmfest should not become a popular work with choirs, choral societies and audiences. * Simon Mold, Choir and Organ, July 98 *show more