The Protection of Woodlands Against Dangers Arising from Organic and Inorganic Causes; As Re-Arranged for the 4th Ed. of Kauschinger's "Waldschutz"

The Protection of Woodlands Against Dangers Arising from Organic and Inorganic Causes; As Re-Arranged for the 4th Ed. of Kauschinger's "Waldschutz"

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ...for recently felled timber, before proceeding to attack healthy trees, whose strong exudation of resin threatens the well-being of their brood. In localities where, or under circumstances in which, experience has previously shown that the appearance of such insects is to be feared, a suitable number of stems should be felled and formed into decoy breeding-places; at the proper time later on in the summer, the same operation should afterwards be repeated, in order to obviate the danger that may arise from a second generation within the year. For such decoy-stems, dominated or suppressed, but still healthy, poles, or stems should be selected, and not half-dry ones, that are already nearly dead, as such lose their efficacy too soon. It is also a good thing to provide them with rests below, so that beetles and weevils may have access to every part of the stem, especially to the lower side which remains fresh and sappy longest; and, at the same time, the branches (which also form decoy breeding-places for many species) should be removed by lopping, in order to diminish the evaporation that otherwise takes places through the leaves. If timber from the winter's fall is still lying about in the woods, it can, in the same way, be utilised for decoy purposes. But care must in that case be taken to see that it is removed from the forest by about the middle of May, and that it is not merely taken to be stored at some saw-mill in the vicinity of woodlands, for it should be treated exactly in the same way as other decoy-stems, by being duly peeled and the bark being burned. Decoy-stems must be examined carefully from time to time, in order to see if they have been utilised by insects for breeding purposes. This can be seen from exudation of resin at the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635507
  • 9781236635501