The Project Relative to a Court of Arbitral Justice; Draft Convention and Report Adopted by the Second Hague Peace Conference of 1907

The Project Relative to a Court of Arbitral Justice; Draft Convention and Report Adopted by the Second Hague Peace Conference of 1907

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...a burden, and would entail not merely sacrifice of professional employment, but the additional outlay for necessary and incidental traveling expenses. The committee deemed it inadvisible to fix any rate of mileage. The provisions of each country in the matter of traveling allowances seemed, on the whole, the fairest standard. While these dispositions relate principally to titular judges of the Court, the deputies, while acting as judges, are clearly entitled to equality of treatment. But there is this difference, that the titular judges receive a fixed salary while the deputies only receive traveling expenses and the daily allowance of 100 florins while engaged in the trial of cases. In the original text the various sums mentioned were to be borne by the signatory Powers, according to the proportion established for the Bureau of the Universal Postal Union, whereas in the final form the general expenses of the Court are to be paid by the International Bureau, according to the subsequent agreement of the signatory Powers. Article 10 The judges may not accept from their own Government or from that of any other Power any remuneration for services connected with their duties in their capacity of members of the Court. The purpose of this article, like that of so many others in this project, is to safeguard in the largest possible manner the impartiality of the judges, and to protect them, directly and indirectly, from the slightest charge or suspicion which would reflect upon their honor or freedom and therefore upon their impartiality. Article 9 provided that the judge should receive compensation at the hands of the signatory Powers. Article 10 provides that he shall receive a salary for the performance of judicial duties solely from the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236780728
  • 9781236780720