The Production of Malleable Castings; A Practical Treatise on the Processes Involved in the Manufacture of Malleable Cast Iron

The Production of Malleable Castings; A Practical Treatise on the Processes Involved in the Manufacture of Malleable Cast Iron

By (author) 

List price: US$7.11

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...which assists materially in making for regularity on the part of the apparatus. At the lower part of the producer there will be seen the air inlet, the cap of this practically serving as a grate or rather deflector for the fuel. This keeps the air inlet free. Steam is allowed to enter this air inlet, as shown, and in rushing in through a very small orifice, a large volume of air is drawn in, air and steam entering the incandescent fuel in the producer together. A water seal holds in the gas under pressure of a few ounces, and allows a ready means to remove the ashes without in any way disturbing the continuity of the process. It will be noted that the bed of fuel is very thick. This is necessary, as the chemistry of the process will show. The air entering the bed of incandescent fuel is at once converted to carbonic acid with nitrogen from the original nitrogen and oxygen. As this passes upward the carbonic acid dissolves more carbon and becomes carbonic oxide. This is the real fuel gas. The nitrogen goes up through unchanged, and is the unavoidable and inert diluent of the gas. Now it takes a little time for this extra carbon to completely change the carbonic acid gas to carbonic oxide, and hence, unless the bed is thick enough, the process may not have been completed when the gas emerges above the surface of the fuel. In the chemical examination of the gas, therefore, if the amount of carbonic acid exceeds 4.5 or 5 per cent, the low point of the process, the bed of fuel has been allowed to get too thin. Further, any lack of uniformity in the fuel bed, such as clinkers, solid masses of fuel, or again large voids through which the gas may pass without getting fully in contact with incandescent carbon, means uncombined oxygen in the fuel gas, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 182.88 x 241.3 x 5.08mm | 90.72g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236633385
  • 9781236633385